Discover how you can #ShineATealLight on food allergy this Halloween and enter our colouring contest for a chance to win a special teal prize pack. Read an update on our #FoodAllergyVotes campaign and learn what’s next. Watch our webinar recording on understanding the severity of your food allergy with Dr. Philippe Bégin. Plus, learn more about pollen food syndrome/oral allergy syndrome, a type of food allergy.

Celebrating Halloween: #ShineATealLight and win! Plus, tips and more

Potential risk of a reaction means that many kids are left out of one of the year’s most exciting holidays. So how can we take the fright out of food allergy, and make Halloween a safer, more inclusive holiday for everyone, while at the same time, also increasing food allergy awareness with the general public?

By shining a teal light on the issue! Teal is the recognized colour for food allergy and by shining a teal light, it shows your neighbourhood that you have allergy-friendly treats and toys on Halloween for kids and at the same time it creates food allergy awareness by sparking conversations on how to support kids with food allergy.

While this year’s Halloween will continue to look different due to the pandemic, you can still #ShineATealLight to drive food allergy awareness and make the holiday safe for kids with food allergy. Find out all the different ways below!

#ShineATealLight on Food Allergy#ShineATealLight on food allergy

Pledge your support by lighting up in teal to drive food allergy awareness and education.

Pledge your support by lighting up in teal to drive food allergy awareness and education.

Colour our “Shine a teal light” posters for a chance to win a special teal prize pack! Plus, the posters can be displayed on your front porch to let kids know you have allergy-friendly treats or non-food treats. Contest closes October 31st, 2021.

COVID-19COVID-19, food allergy and Halloween

Stay safe while celebrating this Halloween season. Find answers to your questions on celebrating Halloween with food allergy during the pandemic, and remember to check public health guidance in your area before participating in activities.

Stay safe while celebrating this Halloween season. Find answers to your questions on celebrating Halloween with food allergy during the pandemic, and remember to check public health guidance in your area before participating in activities.

Tips to keep kids safeTrick-or-treating tips to keep kids with food allergy safe

If you’re planning on trick-or-treating, find out how to stay safe and learn what you can do with the candies afterwards.

If you’re planning on trick-or-treating, find out how to stay safe and learn what you can do with the candies afterwards.

Celebrating with your social bubbleCelebrating with your social bubbles

Host a spooktacular allergy-friendly party in your social bubble. Read our tips on having fun and staying safe. Download our tip sheet for hosts to help you prepare.

Host a spooktacular allergy-friendly party in your social bubble. Read our tips on having fun and staying safe. Download our tip sheet for hosts to help you prepare.

Share how you are keeping Halloween safe for all with our free resources. Download and share posters, activity sheets, #FoodAllergyHacks, and more!

Visit foodallergycanada.ca/Halloween for more tips on staying safe and other fun ideas to #ShineATealLight.

#FoodAllergyVotes: Thank you for advocating and next steps 

Thanks to those of you who sent your local candidates a letter and advocated to #MakeFoodAllergyCount during the federal election. By doing this, you helped to create space for food allergy, opening the door for us to continue engaging within government.

More than 500 people sent their federal candidates a letter, reaching 189 ridings nationally – that’s more than half the ridings in Canada! This collective effort is outstanding and demonstrates the commitment of this community.

What’s next

A new federal cabinet will be sworn in soon, and then Parliament will resume with a renewed policy agenda. With a less politically charged environment, more focus can be given on developing policy on issues that matter to those impacted by food allergy.

We will continue to build on the progress made over the last couple of years through government engagement, highlighted by the securing of additional suppliers of epinephrine auto-injectors in the Canadian market last year, resulting in greater access and more options for patients and families. With much more to be done, we will continue to call for government support of the National Food Allergy Action Plan and move forward on priority issues. Adding your voice to these conversations are effective – and necessary – to securing long-term change.

Stay tuned to learn how you can get more involved and help us continue to create meaningful change. Together, we can #MakeFoodAllergyCount.

Watch now: Understand the severity of your food allergy with Dr. Philippe Bégin 

Last week we hosted a webinar with Dr. Philippe Bégin on what makes your food allergy severe. If you missed the session or would like to view it again, the recording is now available to watch. 

In this webinar, you will be introduced to the concept of thresholds (the lowest amount of a food allergen that can trigger a reaction), how co-factors and other mechanisms/therapies can change the threshold at which one reacts, and an exploration on how they all relate to understanding the potential severity of food allergy. You will also learn why allergic reactions are only mildly uncomfortable for some, while with others they can be life-threatening.

Watch the webinar now and please share with others, so they can also learn from the information shared in the session.

Understanding pollen food syndrome/oral allergy syndrome

You or your child may have seasonal allergies to tree, grass, or ragweed pollen, and also experience itching inside the mouth or throat when eating fresh fruits / vegetables or tree nuts. If so, pollen food syndrome (PFS), also known as oral allergy syndrome (OAS), may be the cause. 

With PFS/OAS, the proteins in certain fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts are similar to those in pollens, and this “cross-reactivity” can cause allergic symptoms like the itchiness described above. 

Learn more about this type of food allergy on our site and download our new pollen allergy & foods chart to find examples of some foods that are similar to certain pollens.

Selection of healthy rich fiber sources vegan food for cookingOral Allergy Syndrome (OAS)/Pollen Food Syndrome (PFS)

This content was originally published here.